Sometimes called degenerative joint disease or “wear and tear” arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic condition of the joints.

What is Osteoarthritis?

Sometimes called degenerative joint disease or “wear and tear” arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic condition of the joints. OA can affect any joint, It occurs when the cartilage between joints breaks down leading to pain, stiffness and swelling.

 

Who is Affected?

Although OA occurs in people of all ages, osteoarthritis is most common in people older than 65. Common risk factors include increasing age, obesity, previous joint injury, overuse of the joint, weak thigh muscles, and genes.

 

Osteoarthritis Symptoms

The most common symptoms of osteoarthritis are stiffness, particularly first thing in the morning or after resting, and pain. Affected joints may get swollen after extended activity. 

OA symptoms can hinder work, social life and family life if steps are not taken to prevent joint damage, manage pain and increase flexibility.

 

Osteoarthritis Causes

Osteoarthritis has no specific cause. Several factors lead to the development of OA including excess weight, injury or overuse and genes, among others. 

 

Osteoarthritis Diagnosis

The diagnosis of osteoarthritis includes a medical history and a physical examination. These may be followed by laboratory tests, X-rays, and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. 

 

Osteoarthritis Treatment

Osteoarthritis is a chronic (long-term) disease. There is no cure, but treatments are available to manage symptoms. Long-term management of the disease will include several factors:

- Managing symptoms, such as pain, stiffness and swelling

- Improving joint mobility and flexibility

- Maintaining a healthy weight

- Getting enough of exercise

- Physical Activity

- Positive Attitude that can boost the immune system and increase a person's ability to handle pain

 

Pain and Anti-inflammatory Medications used for osteoarthritis are available as pills, syrups, creams or gels, or they are injected into a joint.

 

Reference: Arthritis Foundation. Retrieved from https://www.arthritis.com

 

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